Absolutely christian dating

Stephen Patterson, on the contrary, considers it the end of an earlier edition of the Didache, which concluded precisely at 12:2 (199-324).

The assumption that the scribe's copy of the Didache actually ended with Did 12.2a, though such cannot be absolutely dismissed, is thus an unnecessary and excessive extrapolation. the Didache may derive from a rural rather than an urban situation.

Since it was discovered in a monastery in Constantinople and published by P.

absolutely  christian dating-54absolutely  christian dating-89absolutely  christian dating-4

364): The scribe who copied those seven texts signed the last leaf as "Lean, notary and sinner," and dated that completion to June 11, 1056. Now known as Codex Hierosolymitanus 54, that volume was removed to the Patriarchate at Jerusalem in 1887, where it remains.

Earlier Coptic and Ethiopic versions also exist for a few chapters of this text.

Especially important are two Greek fragments, Papyrus Oxyrhynchus 1782, dated to the "late fourth century" and published by Greenfell and Hunt in 1922 (12-15).

These tiny scraps, about two inches by two inches apiece, contain verses 1:3c-4a and 2:7-3:2.

Marked divergences in style and content as well as the presence of doublets and obvious interpolations make plain the fact that the Didache was not cut from whole cloth.

The dominant view today is that the document was composed on the basis of several independent, preredactional units which were assembled by either one or two redactors (Neiderwimmer 19-70, ET 19-52).

A Coptic papyrus containing Didache 10:3b-12:2a, dated to the end of the fourth or start of the fifth century, was bought in 1923 for what was then the British Museum and catalogued as British Library Oriental Manuscript 9271. They conclude that "this sheet was originally cut from a roll of papyrus in order to serve as a double-leaf in a codex," but instead it was used "as a space for scribal exercises" (87).

It was, in other words, a rather casual copying of that section of the Didache for purposes of writing practice.

The following two points speak against this assumption: 1) There are no decorations which mark the end of the text. It may stem from the consensus of rural households rather than the authority of urban patrons.

Tags: , ,